The process and training of becoming a knight during the middle ages

However, the process of training and equipping a knight with a horse and appropriate weapons was very expensive. Knights would therefore generally come from a noble, or wealthy, family. Therefore a would-be-knight would need to have the right family connections. The origin of the term Knight derives from Anglo- Saxon word Cniht meaning boy or page boy.

The process and training of becoming a knight during the middle ages

Steps to Knighthood Steps to Knighthood - Step 1 The right connections A Knight was recognised by Middle Ages society as a man who possessed great combat skills and who adhered to the Code of Chivalry.

During the Middle Ages, it was technically possible for any free man to become a knight. However, the process of training and equipping a knight with a horse and appropriate weapons was very expensive. Knights would therefore generally come from a noble, or wealthy, family - a would-be knight had to have the right connections.

The origin of the term ' Knight' derives from Anglo-Saxon word "Cniht" meaning "boy" or "page boy". The steps to knighthood started as a boy. The honor of being a knight eventually passed from a knight to his sons. Steps to Knighthood - Step 2 Upbringing His future role as a Knight would be recognised at the birth of a son.

His early upbringing would therefore be governed by this ambition. Up to the age of 7 years old a young boy would be brought up in the home of his parents.

During this time he would be expected to learn basic good manners and to understand the role of the knight, chivalry and loyalty to his liege lord. Games would be played mimicking the role of a knight. Toys would include a wooden sword and shield.

A boy's aspirations to becoming a knight would be fuelled by attending tournaments and hearing stories of brave knightly deeds and combats Steps to Knighthood - Step 3 The Page At the tender age of just seven years a young boy would be sent to commence his education at the home or castle of a noble.

His role would be as a page, the third step towards becoming a knight. A page was also referred to as a 'varlet' meaning 'little vassal'. It was the duty of a Page to wait at table, care for the Lord's clothes and assist them in dressing.

The page was also expected to acts as servants to the ladies of the court or castle her served in. The Page was provided with a uniform of the colours and livery of the Lord.

There were many pages, the number depending on the wealth of the noble. There was a 'pecking order' amongst the pages which was dependent on age. The ages of the pages would range from seven years old up to fourteen years old when they would take the next step to becoming a knight by serving in the position of a Squire.

The young page would receive an education being taught religion, manners, riding, hunting, hawking and strategic games such as backgammon and chess.Get the latest sports news from urbanagricultureinitiative.com The knighthood training of both the Pages and the Squires of the Middle Ages continued with acquiring excellent equestrian skills.

Becoming a knight – Apprenticeship Click here for Battle Ready Medieval Swords and Armors Longswords The Longsword is a type of European sword used during the late medieval period, approximately to with early and late use reaching into the 13th and 17th centuries, respectively. Longswords have long cruciform hilts with grips over 10 to 15in length providing room for two hands.
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•A horse played an extremely important part in the life of a knight. Knighthood Training included learning about the strategy, process and weapons used in siege warfare.

Siege Warfare during the Middle Ages was conducted according to Chivalric Rules and a truce or settlement would always be attempted, according to the Chivalric Code .

The process and training of becoming a knight during the middle ages

Becoming a Knight - The Medieval Squire The Medieval Squire of the Middle Ages was aged between fourteen and twenty-one. They had served as pages and learnt the basic skills required during their Knighthood training.

AUGUST PRIEST OF THE MONTH - REV. JEROME KOPEC.

The process and training of becoming a knight during the middle ages

Even though he felt called to the priesthood at a very young age, Fr. Jerry Kopec noted, “I always say my priesthood is a surprise because where God sends . The way folks moved through the process of learning a craft was usually a commitment of time (usually years) as an unpaid worker that would eventually work into being a paid assistant of some sort and eventually becoming recognized as a smith in their own right.

Steps to Knighthood