Salem witch trials and crucible

Synopsis Act One The opening narration explains the context of Salem and the Puritan colonists of Massachusettswhich the narrator depicts as an isolated theocratic society in constant conflict with Native Americans.

Salem witch trials and crucible

The Salem Witch Trials vs. The Crucible by on Prezi

Miller bases the play on the historical account of the Salem witch trials. In particular he focuses on the discovery of several young girls and a slave playing in the woods, conjuring — or attempting to conjure — spirits from the dead.

Rather than suffer severe and inevitable punishment for their actions, the girls accused other inhabitants of Salem of practicing witchcraft.

Salem witch trials and crucible

Ironically, the girls avoided punishment by accusing others of the very things of which they were guilty. This desperate and perhaps childish finger-pointing resulted in mass paranoia and an atmosphere of fear in which everyone was a potential witch.

As the number of arrests increased, so did the distrust within the Salem community. A self-perpetuating cycle of distrust, accusation, arrest, and conviction emerged.

By the end ofthe Salem court had convicted and executed nineteen men and women. Miller creates an atmosphere and mood within the play reminiscent of the historical period and of Puritan culture.

The inhabitants of Salem lived in a restrictive society. Although the Puritans left England to avoid religious persecution, they based their newly established society upon religious intolerance.

The Puritans demonstrated their faithfulness, honesty, and integrity through physical labor and strict adherence to religious doctrine. The Puritans had no tolerance for inappropriate or unacceptable behavior and punished individuals publicly and severely if they transgressed. Miller captures the intolerance and religious fanaticism of the period and effectively incorporates them into the play.

Reading about the Salem witch trials and the paranoid frenzy going on at the time is one thing, but witnessing the trials first hand is quite another experience.

Salem witch trials and crucible

Miller permits the audience to do just that by transforming the faceless names from history into living, breathing characters with desires, emotions, and freewill. Miller did make adjustments to the ages, backgrounds, and occupations of several of the individuals mentioned in the historical records, however.

For example, he lowers the age gap between John Proctor and Abigail Williams from sixty and eleven, respectively, to thirty-five and seventeen, enabling the plot line of an affair between the two. Proctor and his wife Elizabeth ran an inn as well as a farm, but Miller eliminates this detail.

Finally, Miller chose to omit the fact that Proctor had a son who was also tortured during the witch trials because he refused to confess to witchcraft. This classic love triangle appears repeatedly in literature, not to mention the supermarket tabloids. On one hand Miller addresses a particularly dark period in American history — a time in which society believed the Devil walked the streets of Salem and could become manifest in anyone, even a close neighbor or, worse yet, a family member.Inspired by the McCarthy hearings of the s, Arthur Miller's play, The Crucible, focuses on the inconsistencies of the Salem witch trials and the extreme beh.

The Salem Witch Trials vs. "The Crucible" By Daphne Austin Difference between "The Crucible" and the real trials More Differences Abigal Williams was only 11 when the Salem witch trails were going on.

In The Crucible by Arthur Miller, the madness of the Salem witch trials is explored in great detail. There are many theories as to why the witch trials came about, the most popular of which is the girls' suppressed childhoods. Moreover, they note that because of the trials' dramatic elements, "it is no coincidence that the Salem witch trials are best known today through the work of a playwright, not a historian When Arthur Miller published The Crucible in the early s, he simply outdid the historians at their own game" (22).

In an odd way, then, The Crucible is best read outside its historical context—not as a perfect allegory for anti-Communism, or as a faithful account of the Salem trials, but as a powerful and timeless depiction of how intolerance and hysteria can intersect and tear a community apart.

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In John Proctor, Miller gives the reader a marvelous tragic. Abigail Williams (July 12, – c. October ) was one of initial accusers in the Salem witch trials, which led to the arrest and imprisonment of more than innocent people suspected of witchcraft..

Salem Witch Trials. Abigail and her cousin Betty Parris were the first two accusers in the Salem Witch trials of and Williams was twelve Known for: First accuser in the Salem witch trials.

Salem Witch Trials - HISTORY